Help Arrives for Women-Owned Restaurants

What’s Happening to Women-Owned Restaurants?

The COVID-19 pandemic hit the restaurant industry harder than others. Within that, woman-owned restaurants have suffered even more.

Why is this happening? According to Forbes, it’s largely because of the usual systemic factors that disproportionately disenfranchise women. Although they make up 53% of restaurant workers, only 7% rise to head chef. Those that make the cut earn 28% less on average than men working the same position. Between discrimination, a tendency to receive fewer sponsors and media opportunities, expectations to take on the bulk of the childcare, and having, overall, less capital are major roadblocks for female restaurateurs.

Thankfully, help is arriving. It’s coming in the form of both government- and private-funded relief efforts aimed at supporting women in the restaurant industry.

| eatOS December 1, 2021 women-owned restaurants

Photo courtesy of eatOS

Funding and Assistance

In March, the federal government passed a stimulus bill that set aside $28.6B for the Restaurant Revitalization Fund. Although this only covers a fraction of what the industry lost, there are also fewer establishments to fund. Many buckled under the financial constraints of COVID-19 and permanently closed.

The stimulus bill also stipulates some provisions that aid women-owned businesses and other marginalized communities (if these demographics make up the majority of ownership). Meanwhile, some organizations have gotten in on the business of helping others including the food delivery platform, Grubhub. Introducing their new program, RestaurantHER.

RestaurantHER will assist woman-owned restaurants and deal directly with sexism in the industry.

How RestaurantHER Is Helping Women-Owned Businesses

From uplifting female restaurant owners to opportunities for long-term growth, RestaurantHER focuses on bringing out the potential in woman-owned restaurants. The initiatives include…

  • teaming up with female chefs and restaurateurs.
  • providing grants and resources that they need to progress their culinary careers.
  • Donate the Change program whose proceeds go toward female-empowering initiatives that help women advance in the culinary field.
  • Sound Bites, a virtual concert featuring outstanding female artists whose funds go to World Central Kitchen. WCK is a nonprofit organization that donates nutritious meals to people in need following a massive disaster—and this pandemic certainly qualifies.

This program also, inadvertently, creates a strong community for women restaurateurs to network and support each other through these hard times. It sets the stage for potential partnerships as the world slowly returns to normal. Women-owned restaurants have a greater ability to work together and make promotions, events, and other revenue and press opportunities.

Where Technology Fits In

As small businesses get back into the swing of things after COVID-19, they’ll need top-of-the-line equipment to handle the evolving consumer marketplace. When you invest in advanced technology, you not only meet your customers in the future of convenience and efficiency but also give yourself an advantage over the competition. Expand your marketability and the areas in which you can be creative, and your profits will grow alongside your business.

It’s been a hard year for women-owned restaurants. Getting back in the game means taking every advantage possible. eatOS offers an all-in-one cloud-based eco-system exclusively for restaurants. From Point of Sale to Contactless Ordering, Pay & Order at Table, Kitchen Display System, Customer Facing Display, Online Ordering APP / Website and Workforce Management there is everything to help a restaurant succeed no matter the size. Click Here to Schedule a demo to learn more about how your restaurant can make a smooth transition into the world of restaurant technology made simple.

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